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If The Joint Is Jumping You’re Caught On The Hop

Howard Golder on good riddance to bad welds – part 2

LAST month we looked at common reasons why welds turn out badly, and explained that inattention to preparation and detail is often at the root of the problem.

So what can you do to avoid bad welds and deliver a professional job?

The most effective, time proven way to weld joints is to overlap the sheet edges and cut in the joint using a hook blade to follow the edge of the bottom sheet.

An alternative is to use a scoring blade to run along the edge of the top sheet scoring a line on the bottom sheet.
The bottom sheet is then cut using the hook blade. This makes it easier when guiding the flooring into position once it has been adhered. The cut-in joint forms a neat, tight joint. Before welding, the joints need
to be grooved using a ‘U’ shape or bar groover, or an automatic grooving machine fitted with a diamond tipped blade. The depth of the groove should be approximately 75% of the flooring thickness.

The self-coved sections if applicable should be welded first then the flooring joint areas. It is always best to try a test piece first using an off cut of vinyl. This ensures the temperature settings are suitable for the product

and conditions.

The best travel speed is 2m to 3m per minute to correctly fuse the rod to the floorcovering. Leave the rod to cool before cutting and trimming with the sledge and spatula. Trim and dress the coved weld using a flat

router blade.

Bad fitting mitres also cause problems with welding. Internal and external mitres should be welded first and whatever the chosen method employed to achieve the mitres, it is essential the joints are even, neat and tidy.
When welding mitres, use the correct speed nozzle, and position the nozzle in the up position enabling the weld gun to access the top corner of the mitre.

Run down the mitre slowly and finish at the bottom against a spatula blade. This will give a neat finish at the end of the weld.

Allow the rod to cool and then trim off using a round shaped router blade for the internal mitre and blend in the edges. On external mitres the coved section needs to be grooved.

Make sure a natural ‘vee’ shape has been created down the vertical edges, weld the same way as the internal mitre, and allow the rod to cool. Trim off using a flat edged router blade and blend.
If prepared correctly, the resulting welded joints will be neat, tidy and above all else, very strong!
Next month we give tips and techniques for welding safety flooring incorporating PUR easyclean technology, which requires a slightly different approach because of its formulation.

Howard Golder is a member of Altro’s technical team
www.altro.co.uk

T: 01462 489405

LAST month we looked at common reasons why welds turn out badly, and explained that inattention to preparation and detail is often at the root of the problem.

So what can you do to avoid bad welds and deliver a professional job?

The most effective, time proven way to weld joints is to overlap the sheet edges and cut in the joint using a hook blade to follow the edge of the bottom sheet.

An alternative is to use a scoring blade to run along the edge of the top sheet scoring a line on the bottom sheet.
The bottom sheet is then cut using the hook blade. This makes it easier when guiding the flooring into position once it has been adhered. The cut-in joint forms a external mitres the coved section needs to be grooved.
Make sure a natural ‘vee’ shape has been created down the vertical edges, weld the same way as the internal mitre, and allow the rod to cool. Trim off using a flat edged router blade and blend.

If prepared correctly, the resulting welded joints will be neat, tidy and above all else, very strong!
Next month we give tips and techniques for welding safety flooring incorporating PUR easyclean technology, which requires a slightly different approach because of its formulation.

Howard Golder is a member of Altro’s technical team
www.altro.co.uk

T: 01462 489405

This article has been reproduced from the Contract Flooring Journal website. You can find them at www.contractflooringjournal.co.uk.